Meditation and Self Inquiry

Look Within

Within the complexity of human life 
lives simplicity. 
Hidden by all of our ideas and explanations
is truth.
Behind our posturing 
breathes innocence. 
All of our struggles 
camouflage ease.  
Our fortifications 
protect us from love
~Swami Ajaya

Most of what we do in life including the practice of meditation involves attempting to reach something different or better. We are usually looking to improve ourselves in one way or another. In the case of meditation this “something better”, may be achieving a state of relaxation or contentment. This focus on self-improvement can accomplish a great deal in the world, but it cannot lead to ease of being because it is driven by discontent.

Fortunately, there is another way to live. The way of self-inquiry and of true meditation explores the truth of what is, rather than seeking something “better”. Opening to what is, shifts you from being a seeker to a finder and enables you to live as effortless being. This does not diminish your ability to accomplish; it enables you to accomplish without resistance and stress, responsive to what is. This way of being is not something to be attained; it is who you are here and now. In true meditation and self-inquiry you are here and now.

Many teachers talk about how to meditate or practice self inquiry and then leave you on you on your own to figure out what they are pointing to and how to practice. Here is an opportunity to practice with a guide present with you. Explore meditation and self inquiry together with Swami Ajaya. He will join you in your actual process and guide you in entering deeper into your experience of being awareness.

Appreciation from a Student

You have been in my thoughts lately and I wanted to share with you how grateful I am for the meditation you taught me back in May. After a minor freak out, I abandoned my mala and all the tantric methods that promised to transform me, and entered into an undefined experience that continues to unfold. My meditations have been so sweet and peaceful, I let my mind wander about and often giggle at where it goes and what it tries to figure out and hold on to. Eventually there is a sort of stillness (more like a lulling wave) absent of struggle and absent of the need to define who I am and what I am doing. Much to my amazement, by letting go of the methods and the struggle to control and direct my mind, I find peace, connection, and an open heart.